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Pablo Picasso at Prado Museum 2015

Understanding Picasso

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” Pablo Picasso

Understanding Picasso

This is one of my favorite art quotes because I truly believe there’s child inside of each of us and each child is an artist. Unfortunately from the moment we arrive in this world we’re put in chains. Mental barriers built for thousands of years by our civilised society. Therefore our parents, family, friends, teachers and the entire system play roles in adding more and more chains on the brain.

As an artist is a perpetual struggle to break free from these metal limitations.

Chains on the brain, such a powerful metaphor! Reminds me of my dear friend artist and author David Goff. www.chainsonthebrain.com

Going back to Picasso, he is one of the most controversial artists of 20th century. And interestingly, the 20th century artist that I had the pleasure to “connect” with via the highest number of original paintings that I’ve seen so far.

From all past exhibits, art auctions, and museums collections I’ve seen, one by far was the most intriguing to me: a selection from the 300 works by Pablo Picasso housed at the Kunstmuseum Basel, exhibited at the Prado museum in Madrid, from 18 March to 13 September, 2015. The exhibition presented ten paintings realized by Picasso between 1906 and 1967, side by side with other European painting masterpieces exposed in Prado’s central gallery.

I was so privileged to be there and see originals such as:

Bread and Fruit Dish with Fruit on a Table (1908–9)
Girls on the Banks of the Seine, after Courbet (1950)
Woman with Hat seated in Armchair (1941–42)
Aficionado (1912)
Woman with a Guitar (1913)
Two Sisters (1906)
Sated Harlequin (1923)
Man, Woman and Child (1906)
Venus and Love (1967)
The Couple (1967)

On top of that,  visiting Reina Sofia National Museum and its “piece de resistance” Guernica (painted by Picasso in 1937 and acquired by the government of the Spanish Republic the same year) , along with other Picasso artworks, was the moment when I finally understood Picasso.

Now, I know his art is about the struggle to convey within the chaos of 20th century reality, a manifest against war, loss and human suffering. And from another angle, a critical autoportrait against male dominance. The mythical minotaur raging to come alive not only in paintings, but in the day by day life too.

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